would Trump’s leadership last long? know why

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would Trump’s leadership last long? know why

One of Trump’s highest-ranked and most-trusted campaign hands, who then scored one of the most powerful positions in the White House, is now saying he wants to answer questions under oath about the Trump team’s alleged Russian connections.

But the revelation on Thursday that fired former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn, who also served as a top campaign aide,

Russian politics have a reputation for being a difficult to decode. As stereotypes go, this one is well-earned and enduring.
Moscow’s intentions have bedeviled world leaders for more than a century. Winston Churchill famously declared that even he, the celebrated political prognosticator, could not “forecast to you the action of Russia.”

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 27: U.S. President Donald Trump listens while meeting with women small business owners in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on March 27, 2017 in Washington, D.C. Investors on Monday further unwound trades initiated in November resting on the idea that the election of Trump and a Republican Congress meant smooth passage of an agenda that featured business-friendly tax cuts and regulatory changes. (Photo by Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images)

If you’re arriving on the scene late, the Flynn news can be summed up this way: One of Trump’s highest-ranked and most-trusted campaign hands, who then scored one of the most powerful positions in the White House, is now saying he wants to answer questions under oath about the Trump team’s alleged Russian connections.
That’s the news. What follows is a reminder of how we got here.
Questions about his campaign’s alleged ties to Moscow seem to proliferate by the hour. The mushroom cloud surrounding his baseless allegations that President Barack Obama wiretapped Trump Tower is spreading faster. The investigations have become difficult to keep track of — and those are just the ones we know about.

But the revelation on Thursday that fired former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn, who also served as a top campaign aide,

Russian politics have a reputation for being a difficult to decode. As stereotypes go, this one is well-earned and enduring.
Moscow’s intentions have bedeviled world leaders for more than a century. Winston Churchill famously declared that even he, the celebrated political prognosticator, could not “forecast to you the action of Russia.”

Can the House Russia investigation survive?
One week ago, the House Intelligence Committee provided the stage for Comey’s stunning revelation that federal investigators are conducting a criminal probe into whether top aides for the sitting US president coordinated political attacks with Russian officials in their bid to win the White House last year.
That statement set off an immediate firestorm, punctuated in part by Trump tweeting commentary from the official White House account while the hearing was still going on and White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer offering the shocking — and inaccurate claim that former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort played a “very limited role” last year.
And Comey also shot down Trump’s claims he was wiretapped in Trump Tower by former President Barack Obama.
But two days later Nunes effectively revived Trump’s wiretap claims by reporting that Trump’s own communications may have been picked up in “incidental” collections by domestic spies. Nunes then went to Trump directly with his findings — but never told Democrats on his own committee.
Questions about his campaign’s alleged ties to Moscow seem to proliferate by the hour. The mushroom cloud surrounding his baseless allegations that President Barack Obama wiretapped Trump Tower is spreading faster. The investigations have become difficult to keep track of — and those are just the ones we know about.

Hacks! Here’s what the US intelligence community says actually happened
During the campaign, hackers stole emails from the Democratic National Committee and the personal account of Clinton campaign chairman, John Podesta. The messages were then published by WikiLeaks.
The DNC emails revealed that party leaders had favored Clinton in her primary contest with Sen. Bernie Sanders. Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a congresswoman from Florida, resigned her post on the eve of the Democratic convention in Philadelphia. The episode put a damper on the quadrennial confab and confirmed, to some Sanders supporters, the idea that the race had been rigged against them.
The Podesta hack yielded less damaging information.
If anything, its contents showed how banal the inner workings of Washington can be. But their slow bore dissemination kept a cloud over the Clinton campaign during the summer and into the fall of 2016. Political opponents, critics and conspiracy theorists seized on every word, even the most innocent, and concocted or hinted at faux scandals.
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